Roasted Wattleseed Almond Cookies

Wattleseed is an edible seed that comes from any variety of the Australian Acacia plant. They were traditionally used by indigenous people who ground them into a flour that was used to bake bread.
Serves:

6

Prep Time:

10 minutes

Cook Time:

15 minutes

Jump To Recipe

Roasted Wattleseed Almond Cookies

Wattleseed is an edible seed that comes from any variety of the Australian Acacia plant. They were traditionally used by indigenous people who ground them into a flour that was used to bake bread.

If you are wondering what on earth it tastes like, think of a combination of freshly roasted coffee and toasted hazelnuts… Yeh. Yum!

Australia is notorious for its harsh climate of dry bushland, which explains why we have such a unique array of flora and fauna. And these treasured seeds are found in pods protected by a hard husk the seed during long periods of dormancy.

It’s no wonder indigenous cultures of Australia sought out this highly nutritious seed.

The wattleseed you buy now comes as a powder which is dried, roasted and crushed. So you don’t need to harvest and hand grind it like it was traditionally done! You can buy it from The Australian Superfood Co. .

Roasted Wattleseed Almond Cookies

Wattleseed is an edible seed that comes from any variety of the Australian Acacia plant. They were traditionally used by indigenous people who ground them into a flour that was used to bake bread.

Serves:

6

Prep time:

10 minutes

Cook time:

15 minutes

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 tbsp flaxseed, ground
  • ½ cup almond butter
  • 1 tbsp roasted wattleseed, ground
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ⅛ tsp salt 
  • 1 tbsp erythritol based sweetener OR 1 tsp pure monk fruit powder
METHOD
  1. Preheat the oven to 180C and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. In a small bowl, make a flax egg by combining the flaxseed with 30ml of water and allow to sit for 2 minutes to thicken.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the almond butter, wattleseed, baking powder, salt and erythritol.
  4. Stir in the flax egg and mix until it forms a dough. This is best done with hands.
  5. Shape into 6 cookies and bake in the oven for 12-15 minutes. Leave to cool completely before removing from the tray. They will be very soft straight out of the oven.
 
Notes
  • Erythritol is a sugar alcohol that forms the base of many granular “sugar free sweeteners”.
  • Pure monk fruit powder is another sugar-free option, not to be confused with “monk fruit sweetener”. These ingredients are used in very different ways in recipes.
  • The use of erythritol and pure monk fruit powder in this recipe is what makes it low-carb and/or keto friendly. If this is not a worry for you, the best substitution is coconut sugar which can be used in the same quantity as erythritol based sweetener. Please know that the use of coconut sugar takes away the sugar-free status of this recipe and may alter the colour of the finished product.
  • Read more about these sweeteners here, including my product recommendations. If you are unsure what to use, read more about sugar and my philosophy here.
  • This recipe works with cashew butter. 
  • If you need another sweetener, I recommend using three tablespoons of coconut sugar. Please note these will no longer be sugar-free.
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